How to Take Care of Kittens

How to Take Care of Kittens

Kittens have unique and wonderfully playful personalities. If you have decided to adopt a kitten, there are steps to take that will keep your kitten healthy and happy.


According to the web site “All Creatures/Kitten Care”, written by David E. Hammmet, DVM, a kitten will require several vaccinations between eight and sixteen weeks of age. These vaccinations will guard against upper respiratory illnesses, feline leukemia, rabies, and feline panleukopenia. Without these vaccinations a kitten can become seriously ill and possibly die.


“Kitten Care” also recommends talking to your veterinarian about medications for preventing and controlling internal parasites. Parasites that can infect a kitten are tapeworms, coccidia, giardia, roundworms, and hookworms. A kitten infected with these parasites will experience vomiting, diarrhea, and can become extremely ill.


The same article recommends checking the kitten’s skin for external parasites such as ear mites, ticks, and fleas. There are very good prescription products available that are given monthly to prevent and control fleas and ticks.

Talk to your veterinarian and find out which one is right for your pet. If your kitten is scratching its ears excessively it may have ear mites. A prescription is available from your veterinarian to eliminate ear mites.


Cats and kittens generally do not overeat, so food should be made available at all times. Feed your kitten a good quality food. This will ensure the kitten is getting the right amount
of vitamins and minerals necessary for growth. Avoid feeding your kitten table scraps. Table scraps will cause a kitten to become overweight, and the kitten may not get the proper nutrition it requires.


Training a kitten to use a litter box is generally easy. Make sure the litter box contains enough litter for digging and burying. About two to three inches is sufficient.

Place the kitten in the litter box and gently guide the kitten’s paw through the litter. This will teach the kitten what it is suppose to be doing.


The kitten will instinctively know what to do next. Scoop out any solid waste each day, and distribute any wet litter evenly in the box to allow it to dry.


The litter box should be completely changed each week. Scrub the box using hot, soapy water before adding fresh litter. Scoopable litter is very convenient because the box will not have to be completely changed as often.


If your kitten suddenly stops using the litter box this could be a sign of a bladder infection, and your kitten will need to been seen by a veterinarian for treatment.

The bodies of kittens are in the developing stages. The cells are forming
at a rapid pace, and the DNA and RNA within these cells are being
“programmed” so they will know the blueprint for how to build a cell
that will eventually  replace that first one.

In order for cells to build DNA & RNA, certain proteins, minerals,
and enzymes are necessary to be present, along with pure water and oxygen.

If these are not available to the cell in the right amounts, and Quality,
a cell will be formed that is a bit malformed or defective.

When the fetus was in the mother’s womb, the cells were fed from the
mother’s blood. Now, the cells must be formed from the ingredients in
the food the kitten eats.

If the food does not contain the right ingredients the kitten needs, then
obviously the cells will not have the proper nutrients to build the strongest
and healthiest cell possible.

Millions of cells make up what we call organs. If these cells are malformed
or defective, then we have an organ with a tissue structure that is weak
and unable to perform to capacity or is susceptible to disease.

Does this make sense to you?

If so, then we would like to suggest that a kitten needs an excellent quality
food with a very wide range of nutrients in it.

You know that cats are carnivores, meaning they are meat eaters. They
don’t have the ability to manufacture proteins in their liver as dogs and
humans do, thus they have to get their proteins from food.

Complete proteins come from meat sources. Incomplete proteins come
from grains. Incomplete proteins do not have all the amino acids present
required to form what we call a complete protein.

Also you will want to consider the presence of harsh chemical preservatives
that are in some foods, such as BHA, BHT, and ethoxyquin. All have been
proven to play a role in various degenerative diseases such as kidney
and liver disease, and cancer.

Now, what do you believe would be better for your little kitten, a food
that has a cancer causing agent, or a food that has all natural
preservatives?

Our suggestion then is to look for a kitten food that has at least 2 to 3
meat sources of proteins to every one grain source.

And to look for a food that has all natural preservatives instead of toxic
chemicals.

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